The Unnamed Restaurant

This is part of a set of reviews taken over a few days in which we gorged ourselves silly at the numerous Szechuan Chinese restaurants located near Central Market. The street is 136 and the best landmark I can give is they are just east of the KFC on Monivong. I have placed a map at the bottom of the review with the street highlighted in red.


Looking for a translation

Looking for a translation

The next place I will call the Restaurant without a Name (or until I can get a translation).  The restaurant is called Zhongqing Xianglaxiang which translates to Zhongqing [Chunking] Fragrant and Spicy. The interior of the place is almost identical of the Sichuan Restaurant. Nothing too fancy. It’s cheap and filling but will it be tasty?

For the review, we had three items. Boiled Pork Dumplings ($1.50), Spring Onion Noodles ($1.50), and Sour & Spicy Soup ($1.50).


Even though we asked for the fried version, I found the dumplings to be quite tasty. I am a bit weird as I like to have my dumplings seasoned enough for non-dunking and these were easily seasoned enough. Also, each dumpling didn’t have the copious amount of green onion that many on this street have. A more meat to green onion ratio is always a good thing.

The Spring Onion Noodles however did need some seasoning. Along with thin noodles, it consisted of green onions and fried egg. After adding some soy sauce, and chili, they were more than passable.


Lastly, we had the Sour & Spicy Soup. Consisting of tofu, egg drop, tomato, wood ear mushrooms and chopped green onions, I found it to be more sour than spicy. That being said, after adding some chili, it was very nice.

I found this restaurant to be a bit frustrating. The one item that you would generally dunk to get more flavor (dumplings) were the most flavorful dish of the three. Considering the non-English sign, I was hoping for a bit more personality out of their dishes.  — Vinh

Always nice to see “thumbs up sauce” (black vinegar dumpling sauce) on the table when starting a meal.  However, this place was not worthy of the thumbs up.

The stir fry noodles were decent but not a whole lot of flavor and a bit too greasy, which is saying something.  Greasy enough to feel like there was a layer of grease covering your face after every bite.  I ended up eating a couple bowls of the soup which wasn’t bad but it was kind of a not quite hot and sour soup flavor.  Or at least the kind I am used to.

Boiled dumplings are pretty much always a travesty in my book.  Especially veggie heavey boiled dumplings with a bad dough skin to filling ratio (way too much boiled dough for these guys).  The fried dumplings may be alright but it’s probably not worth a return visit. — Bryse

Vinh: 2.5 out of 5 nyamies

Bryse: 2 out of 5 nyamies

Szechuan Chinese Restaurants Map

Szechuan Chinese Restaurants Map

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4 Comments

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4 responses to “The Unnamed Restaurant

  1. Alison

    Hi Nyam Penh, I’ve been enjoying the blog. I’ve been studying Khmer for awhile but not a native speaker. From what I can tell the sign in regular (not moul script) is: ឆុងឈីង ហិលឈ្ងុយឆ្ងាញ់. To romanize that it might be something like: Chong ching (A name?) Hul (can mean dull, like for a knife, but perhaps also part of a name?) Chnguy Chnganyh (to smell and taste delicious). Of course a native speaker would probably have corrections. Thanks for all your great posts!

  2. Ben

    Here’s my dad’s translation of the restaurant sign:

    “It is called the “Zhongqing [Chunking] Fragrant and Spicy” Zhongqing Xianglaxiang. It likely specializes in Sichuan-style food. Zhongqing is the large city at the central part of the Yangzi that used to be part of Sichuan, now a provincial level city, and China’s wartime capital. The first two character are Zhongqing and then “fragrant” (xiang) spicy (la) and fragrant (xiang) repeated. So it is tasty yet spicy. “

  3. Huzzah! That makes sense. It seems they misspelled the Khmer word for spicy ( ហឹរ) as ហិល​ which is how it sounds, but is not how it’s spelled in Khmer.

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